3 Ways Video Can Help Transform HR

In January, Bernard Marr posted an article, Why Everyone Hates HR. While this is an intentionally provocative statement, there were many that agreed with him. His argument is that the entire Human Resources function needs an overhaul.

In order to transform their image, Human Resource departments need to be more creative and have ways to measure and prove their effectiveness.

We at Viddler see Video as an opportunity to address some of these challenges.

1. Measure Video effectiveness with Analytics

3 Ways Video Can Help Transform HR

Does your team know how effective their videos are? How many employees watched them? Where did they watch them? How long did they watch before losing interest? These are some basic stats that your HR team should know cold.

Here are two common ways that video analytics can be used.

Compliance Videos

The days of simply posting a video on your intranet and assuming everyone got the message are over. They need to understand what messages are being heard and which are following on deaf ears. The HR team should be able to quickly followup with busy or disengaged employees by monitoring video completion rates.

Training / Informational Videos

Video analytics can tell you if your video messages are working or not. What percentage of viewers watch the entire video? Where do they drop off? If employees stop watching after two minutes, then improve the quality and content of the video; don’t always assume it is the viewers fault!

2. Streamline the Hiring Process with Video interviews

Why are we still relying on a paper resume to make these essential hiring decisions?

Use video to evaluate their fit with Company Culture

Precious time and money are often wasted bringing people in for interviews that look good on paper but may not have the right attitude for the job. Video is a great way to capture the personality of candidates. Using video is now a legitimate option since most people have cameras, smartphones or laptops with built in video or WebCams.

Using video to screen applicants really works! Viddler used a video application to quickly find a qualified and motivated marketing intern.

 

Share video interviews and feedback

Meeting conflicts often prevent the entire team from meeting and interviewing candidates. Sharing a video interview can avoid having multiple rounds of interviews, making the interview process much more efficient. Just make sure that you restrict the video viewing permissions to prevent the video leaking out into the public. With Viddler, you can even leave comments on the video timeline to make feedback between hiring managers more efficient.

3. Engage your employees with Video contests

One of HR’s responsibilities is to keep employees excited about their jobs. But how do you measure employee happiness? Many companies conduct the dreaded yearly employee survey.

Bernard Marr explains how employee surveys contribute to ‘Why Everyone hates HR’:

“Most employee engagement or satisfaction surveys are a stupendous waste of money and time. Everyone in the organization dreads them and little or nothing ever happens to the feedback. In addition, many only run them because they ‘kind of have to’ or as a PR exercise, showing the outside world what a wonderful employer they are, after priming everyone in the company how to respond…”

Human Resources has to do a better job of demonstrating how employee surveys turn into actionable results.

One way to achieve this goal is to have an employee video contest. By generating excitement within the company, employees will be more engaged and management will be happier as well.

 

3 Ways Video Can Help Transform HR Nokia’s Innovation Video Contest

Video contests can include many kinds of employee-generated content, from workplace safety to new ideas for innovation. Employees vote for their favorites, with prizes given for the most popular, as Nokia did with their recent Lumia AP’Pitch.

By making an investment in video, HR can excite their applicants, employees, and management while creating an engaging experience.